Wireless chip for sensors consumes 100x less than Bluetooth

May 12, 2021 // By Jean-Pierre Joosting
Wireless chip for sensors consumes 100x less than Bluetooth
For streaming real-time sensor data and building wireless sensor networks, the Parsair™ chip enables many novel use cases previously out of reach due to cost, size and power constraints.

Jeeva claims announced the lowest power wireless chip for streaming real-time sensor data. Jeeva's Parsair™ chip consumes 100 times less power than typical Bluetooth and enables many novel use cases previously out of reach due to cost, size and power constraints. The low power nature of this new wireless chip can enable densely deployed sensors to communicate at unprecedented scale.

As the demand for "connected things" continues to grow exponentially, low-power radio and battery technologies have failed to keep up with large scale of Internet of Things (IoT) deployments.

"Until now, devices could continuously stream wireless data, rapidly draining their batteries, or could transmit data intermittently to try and stretch battery life." said Scott Bright, CEO of Jeeva. "Parsair™ makes it possible to truly stream data without draining the battery, which will be game-changing for a lot of different industries and applications."

Jeeva's Parsair™ chip achieves this breakthrough capability by enabling communication using reflections rather than generating a radio signal of its own. A nearby wireless router transmits radio signals which the chip reflects to communicate data. Since reflecting energy consumes significantly less power than emitting energy, this approach can enable wireless communication with decades-long battery life. Using Jeeva's pioneering technology, the reflected signal is made to look exactly like a standard radio packet in one of several supported radio protocols, making it possible to easily integrate with commodity hardware and existing product ecosystems.


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